Edward R. Murrow

Edward R. Murrow – A True Media Visionary

This is London”
With those three words, hundreds of thousands, if not millions knew exactly who was speaking – Edward R. Murrow.

Edward R. Murrow, born Egbert Roscoe Murrow on April 25, 1908, was a true “Media Visionary”. A man who devoted his life to telling the news, whether it be on the radio in the U.S. or in various parts of Europe and Great Britain during the second World War, Edward Murrow captured the imagination and attention of nearly every man, woman, and child who listened to him. His experience in reporting on the radio aided him well with the advent and rise of television sets and televised news. With an amazing ability to describe what was going on around him, he fit perfectly in his position as a reporter in Europe during World War Two, recording for later broadcasts in bombers over Axis territory or giving the news from London while bombs fell like rain every night. He is probably best known for his reporting on Senator Joseph McCarthy and the Red Scare during the height of the Cold War in the 1960’s. Controversial at times, this great visionary truly blazed the path for journalism and communications to come while remaining true to his trade.
Edward R. Murrow died from lung cancer on April 27, 1965.¬†Memorialized in a number of movies and programs, his life’s work does not go without notice. Indeed, his legacy lives on even today, with multitudes of awards as well as parks, colleges, and even an high school bearing his name.

As a fitting ending and a tribute to the great Edward R. Murrow, I take a quote from his old World War Two shortwave broadcasts in London:

“Good night, and good luck.”

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